Days For Girls

WOMEN & RIGHTS – Providing girls home made reusable menstrual kits to ensure they will not miss school days or be cut out from social life in their villages.

«Mornings spent doing the kits are also a way for volunteers to connect with each other and to recreate the sense of community»

What is it?

 

A global movement that prepares and distributes menstrual kits for girls living in countries where they would otherwise be forced to miss school days.

WATCH THE VIDEO

What does it do?

 

Founded in 2008 by Celeste Mergens, Days For Girls provides design instructions (watch here) to allow volunteers all over the world to produce washable and reusable sanitary pads. Deliveries are made by the volunteers themselves in collaboration with local organizations, parishes and communities. Along with the kits, girls also receive sex education courses.

WATCH THE VIDEO OF A DELIVERY

How does it activate people?

 

Women are naturally very sensitive to the issue. The simplicity of the patterns breaks any incoming barrier: those who can’t sew can iron, cut fabrics, put the kits together. Mornings spent doing the kits are also a way for volunteers to connect with each other and to recreate the sense of community and purpose that is often lacking in contemporary urban areas.

What is its impact?

 

Days for Girls has reached more than one million girls and women in 125 countries.

Why is it in Design Collisions?

 

Because it tackles a social problem using a creative process and providing the means to those who participate to contribute to the construction of a high-impact collective activity.

Is it design?

 

There is a continuous exchange of information between the girls who received the kits and the Days For Girls organization. Usability, fabric and decoration (some colors are taboo in certain areas) become an integral part of pattern re-development.

The participation of Days for Girls in Design Collisions was made possible by Jillian Crocker, Days for Girls Varese, who made the kits, the photos and the installation. Her daughter Chloe de Groeve, 17, who accompanies her in the deliveries in India, has filmed and edited one of the videos that were shown at the exhibition.